English Course Descriptions

Competency Key

CD Cultural Diversity
CM Communication Intensive
CP Computer Intensive
CM Communication Intensive
QL Quantitative Literacy
VL Visual Literacy
WI Writing Intensive

ENG 10CT: Introduction to Literature

This course is designed to develop and intensify the student’s aesthetic, intellectual, and emotional response to imaginative literature. It is designed as an introductory course in literature for students who are not majoring or minoring in literature, is intended to be used almost exclusively as a course in General Education, and is not applicable to the Major in the B.A. in English/General or Professional Writing, to the specialization in the B.S. in Secondary Education/English, or to the Minor in Literature.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 21: English as a Second Language

This course, for students for whom English is not a native language, develops vocabulary, reading, and writing skills. It does not satisfy the English composition requirement.

ENG 22: Introduction to College Composition

This is an introductory writing course designed to increase students’ writing proficiency and prepare them for the work of ENG 23. ENG 22 focuses on the writing process and provides an introduction to critical thinking and analytical writing. Students gain experience in writing in variety of genres which may include, but are not limited to, proposals, reviews, personal narratives, digital texts, rhetorical analyses, persuasive essays, reports, and critical analysis. Readings are assigned to provoke discussions, provide opportunities for the analysis and synthesis of arguments, and to generate essay topics. Particular attention is paid to topic generation, focus, purpose and development. In addition, mechanics of Standard Edited American English, which may include diction, grammar, syntax, usage, and structure, are addressed as part of the process of writing; however, the focus of this course is not grammar instruction. Students completing this course must still complete ENG 23 or ENG 25 to fulfill the General Education requirement in composition.

ENG 23: College Composition I

This is a sustained examination of and practice with college-level writing. Students will generally take ENG 023 in their first year of college. The course focuses on the writing process and provides sustained practice in critical thinking, reading, and writing demanded by academic, public, and professional writing. Students gain experience in writing in a variety of genres which may include, but are not limited to, proposals, reviews, personal narratives, digital texts, rhetorical analyses, persuasive essays, reports, and critical analysis essays. Readings are assigned to provoke discussions, provide opportunities for the analysis and synthesis of arguments, and finally to generate essay topics. Particular attention is paid to research processes and the conventions of including research in texts. In addition, the mechanics of good writing, which may include diction, grammar, syntax, usage, and structure are addressed as part of the process of writing; however, the focus of this course is not grammar instruction. ENG 023 (or ENG 025) is a General Education requirement for all students in all majors. In addition, ENG 23 is a prerequisite for all upper-division English department courses.

ENG 24: College Composition II

This is an extension of the skills and techniques of ENG 23, with emphasis on writing critical analyses. ENG 23 is a prerequisite for all upper-division writing courses except ENG 231. Unless the high school record indicates unusual proficiency in writing, students are to take English 23 during their freshman year. (The University Writing Center, staffed by trained peer tutors and faculty volunteers, is open daily to any students desiring assistance in developing their writing skills.)

ENG 25: Honors Composition

A first course within the Honors Program that focuses on critical reading, writing, and thinking within the arts and sciences. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the university requirement in composition and the prerequisite for all other upper-division writing courses. This course does not replace ENG 230.

ENG 100WI: Principles of Literary Analysis

This course will examine basic literary terms and genres and their manifestation in the theme and form of selected works of poetry, drama, and fiction. Required for English General and Secondary Education/English majors, and Literature minors.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 101CDCT: World Literature I

World Literature I surveys literary masterpieces from the Ancient period to the Renaissance, focusing on texts outside the traditional canons of American and British Literature. Particular attention will be given to those texts and authors that have had the greatest impact on our literary world.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 102CDCT: World Literature II

Intensive reading of selected masterpieces of world literature which reflect the evolution of human thought, to develop in the student the power of discrimination and the habit of evaluating. Either semester may be taken independently.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 105CTCD: Experiences in American Literature

This course covers representative and foundational period writings in American literature. Particular attention is given to works that illuminate national literary development, intellectual and cultural history, and ideals.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 106CTCD: Experiences in British Literature

This course draws upon texts of the British Isles from the earliest known writing through the present and includes a variety of genres. In this wide-ranging course, students will read (or otherwise experience) a focused selection of British literature that explores the connections and innovations of the literature that continues to shape the world.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 108CTWI: Poetry and Poetics

This course is an introduction to the college level study of poetry. Ideal for writers, teachers, and scholars, the course lays foundations for advanced study in specialized courses. The course builds foundations in the language and forms of poetry by studying masterpieces to illustrate the traditions and aesthetic theories of the art.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 111: Bible as Literature

This course offers a study of the Bible from a secular, literary perspective. The Bible contains an astonishingly rich variety of genres including narrative fiction, history, lyric poetry, wisdom literature, prophecy, parable, apocalyptic writing, and letters. Students in this course will gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of this extremely important and influential part of Western literary heritage.

ENG 118: Current Themes in Literature-Native American Women Writers

This course explores Contemporary Native American writers and their storytelling techniques. This course will put the literature of contemporary Native American writers into conversation with other Native meaning makers such as bloggers, journalists, comedians, and musicians, as well as representations of Native peoples in popular culture.

ENG 119CTVL: American Genre Film

A genre approach to film study designed to introduce the general student to basic concepts in film criticism, aesthetics and history.
Prerequisites:ENG 23 or its equivalent (May not be used to fulfill General Education requirement in Literature.)

ENG 120WI: Current Themes in Literature – Apocalyptic Fiction

This course explores fiction about global catastrophes and the struggle to survive and rebuild civilization following them. This course is aimed at non-majors and fills basic literature requirements.

ENG 121: Current Themes in Literature – Science Fiction

Critical analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of modern science fiction, novels and shorter works.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 122: Current Themes in Literature – The Literature of Peace

An analysis of representative peace-oriented writings of various cultures from ancient times to the present as evidenced in poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 123CT: Current Themes in Literature – American Writers and the Environment

This course uses an Ecocritical approach to representative works in American literature that contemplate nature and reflect on humans’ relationship to the natural world. This course is suitable for both majors and non-majors.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 124: Current Themes in Literature – American Folklore

This course provides students with an introduction to the major genres of folklore, with an emphasis on American folklore. The relationship between folklore and written imaginative literature is explored. Each student is required to engage in one major collection project.
Prerequisites:ENG 23 or its equivalent.

ENG 125WI: Current Themes in Literature – Detective Fiction

This course teaches critical analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of novels and stories of detection. This course is aimed at non-majors and fills basic literature requirements.

ENG 126: Current Themes in Literature – Sports in Literature:An Examination of a Public Metaphor

This course offers literary analysis of works which employ sports as a metaphor for the human condition, its social behavior, and the roles of men and women within it. The authors represented include: Robert
Coover, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Don DeLillo, Rita Mae Brown, John Updike, Harry Crews, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, David Mamet, and Samuel Beckett.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 127CTWI: Current Themes in English – Ghost Stories

This course examines the ghost story as a literary genre from its earliest manifestations in myth and legend through contemporary times, including local ghost lore of the Kutztown area.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 128: Current Themes in Literature – The Thriller

This course introduces students to popular novels best categorized as thrillers. Thrillers feature heart-gripping suspense and heroic people struggling to survive and often save lives or even the world. Students will read and discuss representative novels from such sub-genres as psychological thrillers, supernatural thrillers, spy thrillers, and military thrillers. Some may be current, while others may be of historical interest, as well. Students may also be asked to watch and discuss films that are categorized as thrillers. This course is particularly for non-majors who need to fulfill a general education humanities requirement.

ENG 129CDWI: Current Themes in Literature – Jazz Culture

This course explores the special relationship shared by Jazz and Literature. The course will put the literature about jazz culture into conversation with jazz music, jazz film, jazz dance, jazz theater, and other jazz arts.
Prerequisites:ENG 23,ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 131: Current Themes in Literature – The Small Town in Literature

The course examines the small town, its attitudes and inhabitants in novels, poetry and drama. Focus is on American writing but some world classics will also be studied.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 132CTCD: Contemporary Gay and Lesbian Literature

This course will focus on contemporary gay and lesbian literature with an emphasis on fiction written after the 1969 Stonewall riots. As a relatively new field of literary studies, gay and lesbian literature represents a wide, creative and challenging oeuvre. Novels, poetry, and drama written by and/or about gay men and women will be examined in connection with identity and gender politics, social movements, camp, feminist and queer theory, and the influence of the AIDS epidemic.
Prerequisites:ENG 23

ENG 135CDWI: Contemporary African Novel

Contemporary African Novel will introduce students to a broad sampling of novels written originally in English or translated into English, from Amos Tutuola’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1954) to the present.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 136CDWI: Contemporary African Poetry and Drama

Contemporary African Poetry and Drama will introduce students to a broad sampling of poetry and drama from Africa, written in English or in English translation.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 137CDCT: Experiences in African American Literature

Students of this course will be challenged as they intensively survey the oral and literary tradition of literature and music written and performed by African Americans from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will read works in different literary and musical genres as they survey African-American literature from its beginnings through the 21st century poetry, prose, slave narratives, and fiction, including the corresponding history that encourage the literary production and movements in and by Black Americans.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 138: Literature Banned in Iran

Inspired by Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi, this course will study some of the works read in secret by Nafisi and her students. These works, banned by authorities in Iran as “corrupt,” include some of the masterworks by Vladimir Nabokov, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James, Emily Bronte, and Jane Austen. The class will apply multiple lenses to the works: those of traditional Western critics and those of Dr. Nafisi and her students. This course may be used in general education.
Prerequisites:ENG 23

ENG 139: Current Themes in Literature – Literature and Psychology

In this course, students will use concepts from contemporary psychology to analyze literary works from a variety of genres. Approaching literature through psychology can add greatly to our understanding of literary creation and consumption, and it can teach us about social dynamics and human motivations. This course will consider how authors create their identities, how literary works change our ways of thinking, and how the exchange between literature and psychology increases our understanding of human nature.

ENG 141CTVL: Literature and Film

Designed to give the student an opportunity to consider the similarities and dissimilarities between literature and film. The focus for such a consideration is several literary works that have been made into
films or upon which films have been based. Specific attention is given to structural aspects common to both, such as imagery, language, theme, and point of view. Critical theories relevant to literature and film provide the student with additional areas of study.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 145: Fairy Tale

Why do we still care about fairy tales? What makes them so popular and so relatable to our modern lives? To answer these questions, this course examines classic fairy tales, from their earliest oral and written roots to current representations and transformations. It explores the origins of fairy tales and traces their continual evolution in response to their cultural settings. We will study a number of individual tales in depth, read fairy tales and poetry by contemporary authors, and views films that both depict traditional tales and re-interpret them.

ENG 208: Writing and Rhetoric

Description coming soon.

ENG 219CTVL: Culture and Media

A course designed to apply a group of diverse texts in cultural criticism and theory to the discursive practices of particular media, specifically public relations and advertising.
Prerequisites:ENG 23

ENG 221: Jane Austen – Early Woman Novelist, Modern Media Property

This course examines the work of Jane Austen in her multiple roles as the pioneering woman novelist of two centuries ago, the major canonical novelist she became recognized as in the twentieth century, and the living presence in contemporary culture that she remains. Approaches will include historicist, feminist, and multimedia.
Prerequisites:ENG 23 or equivalent

ENG 222: Conventions of English Grammar

This course surveys the fundamentals and conventions of English grammar and syntax. Topics include lexical categories, phrase structure, clause structure, modification, subordination, punctuation, and language acquisition. Additional attention is given to stylistic concerns in order to sharpen students’ prose. This course is recommended for those pursuing degrees in Professional Writing, English, Elementary Education, and Secondary Education/English although it is open to any student wishing a deeper understanding of English grammar.

ENG 225CDWI: Teaching of Adolescent Literature

This course will include the study of several classic literary works commonly read by high school students but will focus more intensively on the study of modern and contemporary works written for adolescents.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 227: American Poetry in the Long 1960’s

This course is devoted to analysis of poetry and poetics written by American authors during the period currently referred to as the long 1960s, encompassing the late 1950s’ intensification of the Cold War through the mid 1970s, when the Vietnam War and the Watergate hearings drew to a close. Students will read closely a wide variety of poetical forms, both free verse and conventional, produced by authors associated with numerous schools and movements, including (though not limited to) the Beats, the confessional poets, the New York School, the language poets, and the Black Arts Movement. Students will examine significant poetics theory produced during the period, and will discuss those theories alongside of popular cultural appropriations of poetical form. Students will read canonical and non-canonical texts, and will think through the texts’ social, political, and aesthetic contexts, situating the works within two turbulent decades of American culture.
Prerequisites:ENG 23, ENG 24 or ENG 25

ENG 230WICT: Advanced Composition

This course invites students to examine and practice writing as an essential tool for exploring, questioning, and creating knowledge in academic, professional and public spaces. Through advanced study in genre conventions, rhetorical tools, grammatical choices and style, students will be better prepared to analyze and respond to academic, professional or public writing tasks. Students will practice sustained research, close reading, deep revision and reflection on writing processes.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24 , or ENG 25

ENG 233: Contemporary Fiction

This course examines representative contemporary fiction, both American and international, from about 1990 through the present. Topics covered include the development of contemporary fiction, the use of traditional and new literary approaches and strategies of representation in contemporary fiction, themes and motifs found in contemporary fiction, and the historical and cultural contexts of these literary works
and themes.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 234: Ethnic American Literature

This course is an introduction to selected literary writings by 20th century Asian-American, Native American, and Latino authors, with a critical survey of major themes as well as narrative techniques and strategies.
Prerequisites:ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 235CTWI: The American Autobiography

The American Autobiography treats a broad spectrum of 18th to 20th century autobiographies which are characterized by a great diversity in technique, theme, and authorial background.

ENG 236: Black American Literature – Poetry/Drama

An exploration of the poetry and drama of Black Americans, beginning with Phillis Wheatley and William Wells Brown as precursors of the Black literary tradition, and ending with, as the focal point, contemporary poets and dramatists.
Prerequisites: ENG 023 or its equivalent

ENG 237: Black American Literature – Novel

An exploration of the prose writings of Black American novelists and essayists, beginning with the slave narratives as prototypes and ending with, as the focal point, the latest contemporary novels.
Prerequisites: ENG 023 or its equivalent

ENG 238: African Diasporic Literature

African Diasporic Literature will introduce students to a broad sampling of the literature written originally in French, Spanish, and Portuguese, and translated into English, by people of African descent dispersed in such places as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guadeloupe Haiti,Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela. These, and other, places where people tracing their descent to Africa reside, constitute the African Diaspora. The course will be found useful by students in English,Secondary Education, Modern Languages, Women Studies, and General Education.

ENG 239CTWI: Pioneering Pulp Fiction-British Working Class Literature 1800-1860

This course will examine the literature, publishing history and rise of 19th century British working class fiction from 1800-1860, namely, working class autobiographies, the Newgate novel and the penny dreadful. Sold by the chapter on street corners, the Newgate novel and the penny dreadful are the literary representatives of the Victorian working class culture and were the only affordable literature available for the emerging literate of Victorian England. This literature of the streets grew so popular, it became the publishing phenomenon of the early nineteenth century and is experiencing an academic resurgence with contemporary interest in Victorian popular culture.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 242CTVL: International Cinema

This course is designed to explore the underlying structures of film as a communications medium and as an art form. This course will include both foreign and American films.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 244: Documentary Film and Theories of Representation

This course is a study of the documentary film genre, its history, and the theories of representation that have informed its different modes. Whether the intention of the documentary film or video is to preserve
its subject, persuade the audience, or analyze a particular person or situation, students will consider the text from a number of perspectives, including that of the filmmaker, the film subject, and the viewer. In conjunction with documentary film history, students will read some of the theory that informs the production and analysis of this filmic genre. This course is suitable for both majors and non-majors.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 246CDCT: Feminist Film Theory

Cross-listed as WGS246
In this course, students will investigate the intersections of feminist film theory and representations of women’s experience in international film, as well as explore feminist film practices within the narrative,
documentary and avant-garde traditions.
Prerequisites:ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 260: Issues in Composition and Rhetoric Studies

This course provides undergraduate students an introduction to the history, traditions, issues, problems, and debates of Composition and Rhetoric Studies. Despite its long history and growing influence in academia, many students of English are unfamiliar with the depth and breadth of the field of Composition and Rhetoric. It is the goal of this course to familiarize undergraduate students with the historical development of Composition and Rhetoric Studies and the shape of the field today. This course will include inquiry into the major theoretical, professional and disciplinary issues and challenges of the field. The course also provides an introduction to research methods and resources in Composition and Rhetoric, as well as experience writing academically in and about Comp / Rhet Studies.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 265WICP: Research Writing in the Humanities

This course provides advanced study of research and research writing in the humanities that will inform students’ work across disciplines, professions, and contexts. Moving beyond the basics of using search engines, students will develop information literacy as they navigate databases and web spaces, closely read academic studies from across disciplines, and interpret visual representations of data. The course moves beyond “library research,” as students conduct first –person research, such as ethnography, case study, oral history, interview, or survey. Students will draft, revise, and present their original research. This course is an elective in the English major.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 270: Short Story

The development of the short story as a distinct literary type traced by means of wide reading and close analysis.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 272CDWI: Women and Violence in Contemporary Literature and Film

This course will investigate the complex relationship women around the world have with violence. Though formerly only regarded as those in need of protection, women who perpetrate violence have forced a shift in gender roles ascribed to violence. Looking at written and visual texts that depict women as both victims/survivors and perpetrators of violence will allow students to discuss the ways women’s shifting role in violent movements and in texts has changed both the gender ideology and the political climate in a rapidly globalizing world. This course work will look at the ways women’s relationship to violence is constructed and question ideas that women are “naturally” non-violent. While this course does not condone the use of violence, it does study ways women use violent tactics to resist oppression, enact revenge, and find a voice.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 273:The Age of Elizabeth

The course will examine the literary and political flowering of late 16th century England. The focus ofinvestigation will be the role of the Renaissance queen in bringing about England’s “Golden Age.”

ENG 274CDWI: Women, Writing and Rhetoric

While the spoken and written word have long been studied for their rhetorical intent and success, this study has been conducted primarily through a male lens. As such, women’s contributions to rhetoric throughout history, like so many other aspects of women’s experience, have yet to be fully explored. Women, Writing, and Rhetoric seeks to expand the study of rhetoric with a multi-layered consideration of how rhetoric has been informed by, and informs, a female consciousness. This is an elective course for English majors and Women’s Studies minors.
Prerequisites:ENG 23, ENG 24, ENG 25

ENG 275CDWI: Archetypal Women in Myth and Literature

This course emphasizes the archetypal images found in portrayals of women from Greek mythology to the present.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or equivalent

ENG 276CDWI: Nineteenth Century Women’s Literature

This course covers selected literary texts by 19th century British and American women writers. It also focuses upon gender-specific conflicts and changing perceptions about the nature, roles, and rights of women during this important era in the history of literature by women.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 278CDWI[pending approval]: Women Writers around the World

The focus of this course is modern and contemporary literature by women around the world. Students will read selected fiction, non-fiction and poetry, and examine these works primarily, but not exclusively, from the perspectives of Feminist Critical Theory.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 34, or ENG 25

ENG 279WST 279: U.S. and Canadian Women Writers

This course explores some of the major U.S. and Canadian women writers from approximately 1880 to the present. Taking a multi-genre and multi-critical approach, students will study the important contributions U.S. and Canadian women authors have made and are making to modern and contemporary literature. This course is suitable for both majors and non-majors.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 285CTWI: Victorian Sensation Fiction

This course will examine the genre of Victorian popular novels known as Sensation Fiction. These novels thrilled and horrified the Victorian middle class readers with tales of sinister conspiracies, bigamy, murder, sexual scandals, and madness. Students will study the cultural role and unusual narrative forms of this subversive and pleasurably horrifying popular literature.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 300: History of the English Language

This course focuses on the origins and development of the English language, tracing the changes in phonology, morphology and lexicon from its Indo-European roots through the modern period. Focus will
be given to the Old and Middle English periods and the early modern era. This linguistic evolution will be considered agains t the background of relevant cultural and historical developments. Students will also
become familiar with some basic concepts of international phonetics and the terminology of linguistics.
Prerequisites: ENG 023

ENG 316: Rhetoric, Democracy, Advocacy

The connection between rhetoric and democracy is an old one dating back to the origins of both concepts in Western traditions. Simply put, rhetoric, the skilled use of argument and persuasive discourse, and democracy were seen as ways to replace violence as the primary means of governing and maintaining social order. However, the connections between democracy and rhetoric may not be immediately apparent; indeed the two may appear to be in opposition in contemporary society. This course argues that the intimate connections between rhetoric and democracy are critical to retain and reclaim for the health of democratic society and culture. In the era of globalization and digital media, these connections are even more important. A healthy democracy requires citizen advocates who are skilled in the analysis of public discourse, as well as in the production of persuasive texts.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24 or ENG 25

ENG 317CTWI: From Science to Séance – Pseudoscience and Spiritualism in Nineteenth Century Literature

This course examines the 19th century fascination with bizarre phenomena such as mesmerism, séances, and weird science of all kinds. Students will read British and American literary and theoretical texts that engage with contemporary scientific, pseudoscientific, and spiritualist theories and practices, including evolution, phrenology, and mediumship.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 318: Activists Writing Media

The early twenty-first century has seen an explosion in the development, re-purposing, and critical use of new media by political activists. Unlike theoretical debates regarding the relative merits of new media compared to more traditional media or the vigorous business interest in “web 2.0” for its marketing possibilities, activists have approached new media in a rhetorical fashion. For activists, new media are part of the “available means” with which political organizing and campaigning take place. This course explores the multiple and complex ways in which activists have made use of and rewritten what counts as media, who counts as an “authorized” writer, and even what counts as writing. The course will investigate examples of activist campaigns, emergent theories of literacy, and the role of literacy training for the development of activists and how this is often at odds with the literacy instruction students receive in secondary and post-secondary schooling.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG25 or equivalent.

ENG 321:Early and Medieval Literature

This course will explore some of the literature of the Middle Ages (ca. 500-1500) in translation. Readings will be drawn from the Anglo-Saxon period, the era of English and French romance, and the Middle English period. We will read in a number of genres, including epic, romance, fabliau, saga, and allegorical. Special focus will be given to Chaucer.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 322: The Renaissance in England

The poetry, prose, and drama of the golden age of English literature are studied, together with the temper of the times.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent.

ENG 323: Native American Women Writers

This course provides undergraduate students an introduction to selected Native American Women Writers across several genres. Students will experience a variety of writings which move across traditional boundaries (such as nonfiction, poetry, fiction, theory, activist, and so on). The course also provides students an opportunity to consider Indigenous Feminism in theory and practice. Students will consider issues of gender, identity, cross-cultural understanding, individuality and community by intellectually engaging with the texts and performances of Native American women.

ENG 324: Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama

The best and/or most representative dramatic works of the golden age of English drama (exclusive of those by Shakespeare) are read, discussed, and evaluated. Dramatists receiving paramount consideration include Marlowe, Kyd, Greene, Jonson, Chapman, Dekker, Marston, Heywood, Beaumont and Fletcher, Webster, Tourneur, Middleton, Massinger, and Ford.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 325: Seventeenth Century Literature

The writings of Browne, Burton, Donne, Marvell, Bunyan, and Milton studied within the framework of English life from 1600 to 1675.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 327: Eighteenth Century Literature I

Poetry, neoclassical literary criticism, and drama from 1660 to 1780 with consideration of central issues and prevailing attitudes reflected therein; emphasis on major writers.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 328: Eighteenth Century Literature II

This course addresses English literature of the eighteenth century, primarily but not only prose, especially the novel.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 330: Shakespeare on the Stage

A workshop, offered only in summer sessions, designed to supplement courses in Shakespeare with reference to the staging and performance of Shakespeare’s plays. The course is based on reading and examining selected plays through the use of videotapes, films, and available staged performances at summer theatres.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 331CTWI: Shakespeare’s Earlier Plays

A study of a selection of Shakespeare’s earlier plays, including among others, The Comedy of Errors, Richard II, Richard III, Henry IV Parts I and II, Henry V, Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, and Twelfth Night, and of the social, historical, and literary background necessary for their understanding and appreciation. Recordings, movies, and, when possible, “live” and TV productions are utilized.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 332CTWI: Shakespeare’s Later Plays

A study of a selection of Shakespeare’s later plays including among others, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Troilus and Cressida, the Winter’s Tale and The Tempest, and of the social, historical, and literary background necessary for their understanding and appreciation. Recordings, movies, and, when possible, “live” and TV productions are utilized.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 333: Digital Rhetoric and Writing

This course focuses on honing the analysis and production of contemporary digital texts by extending longstanding academic conceptions rooted in the printed word alone. Specifically, the course examines how emerging areas within Rhetoric and Composition such as visual rhetoric, digital writing, and multimodal style are vital in cultivating sophisticated, responsive methods of analysis and production in a variety of online texts. Students will familiarize themselves with issues surrounding the creation, revision, and deployment of digital texts to better understand the complex rhetorics involved when arranging words, images, sounds, coding languages, available designs, fonts, colors, and spaces to make new kinds of 21st century texts and arguments.

ENG 334: Introduction to English Linguistics

A comprehensive study of the grammar of American English: its sound system, its morphological system, and its syntax from the structural and generative-transformational standpoints.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 335: The Rhetoric of Literature

Cooperative investigation of the relationships between literature and rhetoric. Selected works of major literary figures will be examined with reference to their persuasive power and their ability to produce attitude change.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent’

ENG 337HON: Gothic/Horror Literature

This course examines the history of Gothic literature from the late eighteenth century Gothic romance to southern American Gothic fiction and the recent Gothic revival. Representative works, their distinguishing features, their recurrent themes and motifs, their social, psychological and rhetorical implications are also examined.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 338HON: Crime and Punishment in Literature

This is a course in which students participate in critical analysis and interpretation of an international selection of classic works of literature from Greek drama to modern absurdist stories that create the theme of crime and punishment.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 340CTWI:Romantic Movement

The works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and their contemporaries in the light of social background, biography, and critical doctrine.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 341CDWI: Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Literature

Students of Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Literature study various genres and authors from West Indian countries, including Cuba, Haiti, Martinique, Jamaica, and Trinidad. Authors’ works were originally written in English or translated into English. While students will examine selected Afro-Caribbean texts from within the traditional model of literary criticism, including writing style and skill, content significance, and thematic representation, they will also engage the text’s informing agents, including the critical, socio-political, cultural, and historical motivations that influence the authors’ texts.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or ENG 25

ENG 343CTWI: Nineteenth Century Studies – Poetry 1840-1890

The major Victorian poets, Browning, Tennyson, and Arnold, are studied in detail, and certain minor poets are examined.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 344CTWI: Nineteenth Century Studies – Prose 1840-1890

Study of representative prose works in the novel and the essay.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 348WI: Contemporary Drama

Contemporary Drama examines works in English of the previous twenty years. The course includes original plays written in English, translations of plays from other languages into English, as well as new interpretations of revived works. The course discusses themes and subjects in plays relevant to contemporary life: the portrayal of politics, economics and business, treatment of the individual and family, philosophy, religion, sexuality, gender, ethnicity and race, for some examples. The course will also note developments in and illustrations of dramatic theories.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 350CTWI: The Times of Melville and Whitman

A study in depth of Melville and Whitman as creative forces in the shaping of American poetry and prose. Consideration is given to the cultural background from which their works derive.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 351CTWI: American Literary Realism – 1865-1910

This course will focus on an analysis of Regionalism, Realism, and Naturalism in American literature between 1865 and 1910. Special attention will be paid to the works of Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, and New England Regional writers.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 352HON: The World of William Faulkner

An examination of Faulkner’s major novels and several of his short stories in the context of the history of America and the aesthetic, political, and philosophic movements prevalent when they were written.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 353CTWI: Development of the Drama

A comprehensive study of world drama from its beginnings to the late 19th century.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 354: Literacy Studies

This course provides undergraduate students with an introduction to the field of Literacy Studies, including its scientific and theoretical foundations, historical and current perspectives on literacy practices, research methods, and implications for teaching reading and writing. A special emphasis is placed on digital literacies. This course is aimed at deepening and complicating students’ understandings of literacies, as they learn to investigate personal and community assumptions about reading and writing, conduct primary and secondary research, and consider the consequences of Literacy Studies for learning, teaching and critically navigating culture. This is an elective course for the undergraduate English major.

ENG 355: Development of the Novel

The evolution of the world novel traced from its beginnings to World War I.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 358: Rhetoric of Style

This course focuses on understanding historical and contemporary rhetorical conceptions of style in order to foster more sophisticated invention, analysis, and production of 21st century compositions. Specifically, the course examines the idea of style from its ancient understandings rooted in orality up to modern iterations rooted in multimodal composition and digital writing.

ENG 360CTWI: Contemporary British and Irish Literature

British and Irish poetry, drama, and prose fiction since 1965 analyzed in form and content with special attention to the relationship of literary techniques, and cultural, historical, and theoretical context.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 361: Tolkien and Lewis

J.R.R. Tolkien has been called “the Author of the 20th Century,” and C.S. Lewis is likewise one of the best known names among literary and academic figures of the last 100 years. The main goal of this course is to try to explain why two rather marginalized Oxford professors now appear, posthumously, as dominant literary figures for their generation and succeeding ones. While the main concentration will be on the works of Tolkien and Lewis, and their impact on 20th and 21st century fiction, we will also consider the circumstances of their lives and friendship with each other and the group known as the Inklings.
Prerequisites: ENG 23

ENG 363WI: Modern Drama

Reading and analysis of selected plays from the time of Ibsen to the present, thus providing a comprehensive view of the best dramatic literature of the Modern American, British, and European theatre since 1870. Recordings, television productions, and stage performances are incorporated whenever possible.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 364CTWI: Modern Poetry

Representative poetry published since 1870 in England and America as the basis for a study of forms, aspects, and tendencies in contemporary verse, with particular reference to poetry as a criticism of modern life.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 365CTWI: Modern Novel

Studies of the world novel since World War I.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 366CTWI: Cultures of American Modernism

Defining American Modernism as the cultural response to rapid social changes brought on by innovations in technology and shifts in the global economy, this course examines the interplay between key literary
texts, popular texts, social issues, and events that shaped early 20th century Americans’ sense that they were living in a changed world. Some of the social issues open to exploration may be gender, race, psychology, social Darwinism, the breakdown of traditions, mass culture vs. literary form, and the mechanization of modern life.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 367: Symbol and Theme in 20th Century American Literature

Symbol and theme as used by representative major American poets, dramatists, and novelists of the Twentieth Century.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 368WI: Postmodern American Fiction

This course examines postmodern American fiction from its beginnings around the middle of the twentieth century to the present. Topics covered include the relationship of postmodernism to modernism; the specific characteristics of postmodern fiction and the worldview underlying those characteristics; and the question of the “end” of the postmodern period.
Prerequisites: ENG 100 or permission of instructor and Department Chairperson

ENG 370: Seminar – Selected Topics in English

A course for students who wish to study the work of a particular literary figure or a special topic in language, literature, or communications in depth. Students may register for this course more than once
up to a maximum of six semester hours of credit, so long as they do not repeat the same topic; however,they may take no more than three hours of credit in any given semester.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 and permission of the instructor

ENG 371: Independent Study

A course for students who wish to study the work of a particular literary figure or a special topic in language, literature, or communications in depth. Students may register for this course more than once, up to a maximum of six semester hours of credit, so long as they do not repeat the same topic.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 and permission of the instructor and department chairperson

ENG 373: Native American Writing & Rhetoric

This course provides undergraduate students an introduction to selected rhetorical strategies, techniques, and tactics of contemporary Native American peoples in four genres: creative nonfiction, stand-up comedy, journalism, and music. The course also provides students an opportunity to research how certain Native American writers, thinkers, performers, artists, or speakers carve space for their voices in the crowded space of modern intellectual thought and practice. Students will consider issues of identity, cross-cultural understanding, individuality and community as they learn to recognize and practice accretive thinking, rhetorical sovereignty, and argument through imaginative storytelling by intellectually engaging with the texts and performances of indigenous practitioners. This class may also include the opportunity for digital storytelling, blogging, interviewing, and community engagement.

ENG 379CTWI: Literary Theory

This course examines the major critical and theoretical texts of western civilization along with the major modern critical approaches to the study, interpretation, and evaluation of literature, and applies such theory to literary works from primarily western writers. This course explores a number of questions and issues that are central to literary studies. Namely, what is literature? What is the function of literature? Is it an aesthetic object that embodies universal truths or a socially constructed text that participates in the cultural discourses and power relations that create it. How do we analyze and evaluate literature in terms of what it represents? What is the role of the literary critic? Are there correct and incorrect ways to read literature? What is the relationship between writers, readers, society, and literature? What do our individual understandings of literature say about each of us as writers, readers, teachers, and literary scholars?
Prerequisites: ENG 23 and ENG 100, or permission of the instructor and the department chair

ENG 380: Senior Seminar in English

A study of special topics in English and American Literature in preparation for the comprehensive examination. Required of all students in the B.A./English General program.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 382: Film Production Theory

This is a course that uses concepts in Film Theory and Criticism to guide students in the production of a short narrative film. After an intensive study of theoretical and stylistic models found in the work of contemporary and past master film makers, students working collaboratively in groups will produce, script, shoot, and edit a short fictional film on digital video. In this course, students will explore how each filmmaker can act as a role model to embody a distinct point of view expressed in the audio-visual language of cinema; students will similarly learn how to embody their own viewpoint through the medium of film.
Prerequisites: Take ENG 23, 24, or 25, or the permission of the instructor and one of the following courses: ENG 100, 119, 141, 219, 242, 244, 246, 379, WRI 208, 212, 213, 340

ENG 395: Honors Independent Study/Thesis

Honors Independent Study/Thesis

ENG 398: See Honors Supplementary Research

Supplementary research conducted by an Honors student in an upper-division (or 300 or 400 level) course in which the student is enrolled. The research is related to a topic in the course, but in addition to the standard requirements of the course, the research should exhibit advanced inquiry or investigation into the topic. The Honors student earns 1, 2, or 3 credits in addition to the credits for the course itself. The number of additional credits depends on the amount and intensity of the supplementary research. Each department in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences has a specific course number which uses the departmental prefix, but all courses will use a common number (398). The course title will read “Honors Supplementary Research” and will have a variable credit value from 1 to 3 credits, e.g. ENG 398 Honors Supplementary Research.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 410: Feminist Literary Theory

This course provides an overview of the leading currents, issues, and debates in feminist literary theory, including gendered voice, difference vs. equality feminism, essentialism, and queer theory. Students will read theoretical and literary selections from 19th, 20th, and 21st century feminists.
Prerequisites: ENG 23, ENG 24, or ENG 25

ENG 430: Rhetorical Traditions and Contemporary Renditions

This course studies the histories of rhetoric as well as contemporary intersections and applications across disciplines. Depending on the particular interests of the professor, one or more specific area(s) such as media, popular culture, sciences, feminisms and gender studies, composition studies, literary theories, literacies, global issues, pedagogy, arts, and political discourse will be chosen for a more detailed study. Critical to the course are the writing assignments that allow students to examine issues in more depth and explore alternative rhetorical stances and situations.

ENG 438: Major Modern Dramatists

This course is a brief critical survey of British and American drama of the twentieth century with primary focus on the work of such major figures as Shaw, O’Neil, O’Casey, Miller, Williams, Albee and Pinter.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 455CTWI: Seminar in Major Modern Poets

Seminar in Major Modern Poets is a critical examination of the poetry of major twentieth century British and American poets such as W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Langston Hughes, and Wallace Stevens. This course is suitable for undergraduate and graduate students with a background in the analysis of poetry.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 and ENG 364 or its equivalent

ENG 457: Major Twentieth Century American Novelists

The American novel from Dreiser to Bellow. Special attention is given to Hemingway and Faulkner.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 460: Classical Influences on Literature

The influence of Greek and Roman classics on English and American Literature traced from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century. The Classical readings include epic, tragedy, comedy, and poetry.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent

ENG 470: Selected Topics in English

This course will deal in depth with a specific issue or area in English or a literary figure not covered or only covered briefly in another graduate English course. The course may be taken up to two times (6 credit hours), provided that the selected topic is different.

ENG 493: The Twentieth Century British Novel

Comparative studies of selected works of Joyce, Lawrence and Woolf. Analysis of symbol and archetype as structural and thematic device. Rhetorical comparison of elements of style.
Prerequisites: ENG 23 or its equivalent